I. Why donate to WFLI as opposed to giving directly to individual organizations?

With WFLI, the whole is definitely greater than the sum of its parts.  Individual donations are pooled to make a more significant impact.  As important as its financial support, WFLI partners with its grantees for meaningful capacity buildg.  

WFLI grants are based on a competitive process led by a committee of volunteers with diverse professional, community and programmatic backgrounds; among the factors considered before a grant is awarded are the organization’s fiscal and governance practices, anticipated impact and the organization’s track record of producing results.  

In addition to providing grants to deserving organizations, WFLI has a young women’s leadership initiative that includes GirlsFLI and recognition of Young Women Leaders at our Annual Breakfast. WFLI also has programs centered on education and increasing awareness across Long Island on issues related to women and girls.  This includes movie screenings, lectures, discussion groups and compiling data and analytics.

II. Does WFLI do anything other than give grants?

In addition to providing grants to deserving organizations, WFLI has a young women’s leadership initiative that includes GirlsFLI and recognition of Young Women Leaders at our Annual Breakfast. WFLI also has programs centered on education and increasing awareness across Long Island on issues related to women and girls.  This includes movie screenings, lectures, discussion groups and compiling data and analytics.

III. I am a man – can I get involved with WFLI either as a volunteer or by attending WFLI’s annual breakfast?

Yes.  The programs WFLI manages and our grantee partners target women and girls but benefit everyone on Long Island.  Men are welcome to attend all our events and volunteer. 

IV. How do I join WFLI’s committees (Grants Committee, Breakfast Committee)?

WFLI’s depends on the diverse talents of our many volunteers to accomplish our mission.  We welcome new volunteers.  Please contact info@womensfundli.org to inquire about volunteer opportunities.

V. Does WFLI have any opportunities for teenage girls to get involved?

In addition to referring young women to our grantee partners for possible participation, internships and volunteer opportunities, WFLI has two specific programs focused on young women – GirlsFLI and the WLFI Young Woman Leader Award.  

GirlsFLI develops the next generation of young women leaders and promotes youth philanthropy by bringing together high school girls from diverse ethnic, racial, socio-economic and geographic areas to discuss issues facing young people in their communities.  These young women decide for themselves how to reach across their differences to jointly help prevent problems such as gang violence, drugs, bullying, self-esteem, collaborating to change the dialogue….and the outcomes. 

In addition each fall, at WFLI’s annual Women Achievers Breakfast, remarkable young women are recognized with the Shapiro-McCormick Young Woman Leader Award for advocating for girls within their schools or communities and making a difference in the lives of young women through philanthropy, advocacy or other community service efforts. 

VI. I have clothes and household items – does WFLI take these kinds of donations?

WFLI does not accept donations of clothes and household items but we maintain a resource list of organizations that do accept these types of donations.  Please email info@womensfundli.org to request the list.

VII. As an individual, can I get a grant from WFLI?

WFLI awards grants, through a competitive process, to 501c3 organizations only; no individuals.

VIII. When can my organization apply for a grant from WFLI and how does the process work?

Details regarding the grants review process are easily accessible on our website.  WFLI grants are based on a competitive process led by a committee of volunteers with diverse professional, community and programmatic backgrounds; among the factors considered before a grant is awarded are the organization’s fiscal and governance practices, anticipated impact and the organization’s track record of producing results.